Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

ASLA-NY- 4 CEUs & a Beer: Design and Operations Strategies for Maintenance

October 17 @ 12:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Courtesy of ETM Associates, LLC

ASLA-NY 4 CEUs and a Beer: Design and Operations Strategies for Maintenance

EARLY BIRD PRICING THROUGH 10/10!

4 LACES/HSW Credits (Approved)

Sessions and Speakers:

Mark A. Focht, PLA FASLA Deputy Commissioner / Chief Operating Officer at New York City Parks and Recreation – NYC Parks: Design and Maintenance

Once construction of a public park is complete, maintenance begins. Too often decisions are made during design and construction with little thought about maintenance. A park looks beautiful the day the ribbon is cut. Then the ‘maintenance guys’ don’t ‘take care’ of the space. Sound familiar?

At NYC Parks, we work hard to erase the line between design and maintenance. Starting at the highest levels of the agency, there is regular engagement between design and operations. Materials and features have been standardized. Maintenance practices have been adjusted. We strive to create public places which are buildable, cost efficient, exciting, sustainable and maintainable

Tim Marshall, FASLA Principal, ETM Associates – Sustainability: Beyond Design and Constuction

Typically, when we think of sustainability we are speaking of functional design elements such as rain gardens, meadows and green infrastructure, as well as construction methods, materials and practices. But what about sustainability beyond design and construction? What does sustainability mean for the completed project?

Typically, maintenance, operations, and financing issues beyond construction are not included when we are considering sustainability. But in fact, the long-term sustainability of our designs, particularly in the public sector, is crucial to achieving the desired design goals.  The public sector is under constant pressure to reduce spending with disproportionate cuts to parks and other “non-essential” services, which presents a major challenge. Can we have diverse landscape plantings and features, serve the numbers of visitors anticipated and deliver a high quality maintained park landscape, while within these financial limitations? Even without financial pressures, accommodating visitors and their needs while balancing the needs of landscapes can be challenging. Special events only add to the pressures on landscapes, yet are an important component for visitors and, one can argue, security, as a vibrant public space is an important factor in public space safety. To achieve “operational sustainability” for a project and ensure the design goals will continue to be met over time, maintenance, operations, governance, must be considered.

Joe Provenzano, General Manager –  Kelco Landscaping -Building a Park with Maintenance in Mind: Trial and Tribulations

The construction of a public space is not wholly divorced from the infrastructure, plants and amenities that inhabit it. Having your contractor and designer working together allows the final product to be more than just the sum of its parts. Often team can be at loggerheads due to many societal factors like low bid contracts, price escalation and change orders.

Ultimately you want a project to have design and construction synergy. Your contractor is bringing the designer’s vision to life and there will be moments throughout a project where that vision is open to interpretation. You want the project team to work toward an outcome that balances execution requirements (codes, building rules, technical skills) with creative, visually appealing problem solving, all while moving with a good momentum and minimizing cost both in the building of it and in the future maintenance.

Renee Byers, RLA, ASLA – Maintaining the Designed Landscape: Challenges and Strategies for Private Gardens

As landscape architects, we are all versed in key analysis and design principles required in the creation of outdoor living spaces. Oftentimes however, we achieve the upfront project goals, but don’t fully succeed in synthesizing the constraints and opportunities available to ensure that long-term site management will preserve core safety and design elements. Through several case studies of residential gardens, Renee Byers will share design and process strategies she has honed over the years. Practical approaches to hardscape, site lighting and planting design, and grading and storm water management, which can be incorporated up-front to facilitate long-term maintenance, will be presented. Renee will also discuss ways to remain involved with the long-term site management of residential landscapes. Attendees will learn strategies for bringing the client/landscape architect’s shared vision to a maintainable reality and building collaborative relationships with clients and contracting/maintenance teams to preserve the safety and function of our designs

Andrew Lavallee FASLA, Partner, SiteWorks -Managing Maintenance for the Survival of Your Design

Designed landscapes are unique within the construction world because they start a living process that has the capacity to evolve over time.  Unlike architectural or engineering projects, landscape projects, if properly executed and nurtured, grow systemically overtime, delivering increasing ecosystems services as they mature.  Unfortunately, the landscape architect’s role traditionally ends at the completion of construction, often compromising a project’s goals because owners and maintainers may not understand the design’s long-term intent.  Landscape architects are tacitly complicit in the post-installation disconnect because they rarely provide management plans for their projects that take into account specific requirements, skillsets and costs of maintenance. Renewed public and private sector interest in long-term performance and return on investment is changing conversations about maintenance needs. This provides an opportunity for Landscape Architects to re-think design approaches to better manage long-term performance post-installation. This presentation will explore strategies that proactively engage with owners about a design’s maintenance needs.  Through the use case of studies, the presentation will show ways to communicate critical design intent, costs, and upkeep requirements to owners and future maintainers both during the design and post-installation stages of a project.

MODERATOR – Naomi Drucker, RLA, ASLA, RKLA Studio Landscape Architecture

 

 

 

This event is generously sponsored by:

 

www.deeproot.com

 

Registration Required: Complete from below

Details

Date:
October 17
Time:
12:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Event Categories:
, , , ,

Organizer

ASLA-NY
Email:
director@aslany.org

Venue

Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place
New York,
+ Google Map

Details

Date:
October 17
Time:
12:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Event Categories:
, , , ,

Organizer

ASLA-NY
Email:
director@aslany.org

Venue

Center for Architecture
536 LaGuardia Place
New York,
+ Google Map